Teaching

 
Thomas Cooper Library, University of South Carolina, in 1972.  Russell Maxey Collection  (Richland County Public Library)

Thomas Cooper Library, University of South Carolina, in 1972. Russell Maxey Collection (Richland County Public Library)

mid-century architecture on the usc campus

Since 2015, my joint graduate-undergraduate architectural history seminars have focused on mid-century architecture on the University of South Carolina campus. Like many state universities, USC grew exponentially at mid-century, requiring new kinds of buildings and landscapes to serve its expanding mission and student population. The university also used architecture to efficiently communicate its new image and to compete with other schools. Each semester, students in art history, public history, studio art, and other majors write detailed architectural descriptions of buildings on campus, conduct in-depth archival research, and write original narratives of their histories. Class' final deliverables include public tours and reports.

Cornell Arms in 1949.  Russell Maxey Collection  (Richland County Public Library)

Cornell Arms in 1949. Russell Maxey Collection (Richland County Public Library)

mid-century architects: lyles, bissett, carlisle and wolff

My spring 2015 joint graduate-undergraduate architectural history seminar focused on Lyles, Bissett, Carlisle and Wolff, the largest and most active architecture firm in South Carolina between World War II and the mid-1970s. The class’ research focused on the firm’s residential, commercial, and institutional designs and resulted in architectural descriptions, archival research, original historical narratives, a Wikipedia article, and a public tour and report.

The team in front of the iconic Babcock Building on the Bull Street Campus.

The team in front of the iconic Babcock Building on the Bull Street Campus.

exploration and preservation at bull street

Over 2013 and 2014, graduate and undergraduate students and I surveyed and researched the buildings of the South Carolina State Hospital at Bull Street. We worked to help Columbia to better understand the 180-acre downtown site and fought to preserve its buildings. One of the earliest state hospitals (referred to as insane asylums in the nineteenth century), Bull Street was home for thousands of people over two centuries. Our work resulted in a public symposium, an interactive website, and the preservation of multiple buildings previously slated for demolition.


TEACHING AWARDS

Michael J. Mungo Undergraduate Teaching Award, University of South Carolina (2015)

Digital Humanities Course Development Stipend, Center for Digital Humanities and the Center for Teaching Excellence, University of South Carolina (2015)

Outstanding Graduate Teaching Assistant Award, Department of Architectural History, UVA (2009)

Outstanding Graduate Teaching Assistant Award, Department of Art, UVA (2008)

Dr. Frank Finger Graduate Fellowship for Teaching, UVA (2007)


Classes taught at the university of south carolina

Associate Professor, 2017-present | Assistant Professor, 2011-2017

The History of Western Art: Ancient to Renaissance (ARTH 105)

The Practice of Public History (HIST 214)

Modern Architecture (ARTH 337)

American Art and Architecture to 1812 (ARTH 340)

American Art and Architecture 1812-1913 (ARTH 341)

American Architecture (ARTH 542; a case-study based seminar in architectural history and historic preservation)

The Colonial Revival (topics seminar)

American Art and Memory (topics seminar)

Digitizing Madness (digital humanities seminar)